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Borodkina A.V., Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences
Deryabin P.I., Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences
Giukova А.А., Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences
Nikolsky N.N. Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences
ACTA NATURAE, Journal Year: 2018, Volume and Issue: 10(1), P. 4 - 14

Published: Jan. 1, 2018

Cellular senescence was first described as a failure of normal human cells to divide indefinitely in culture. Until recently, the emphasis in the study of cell senescence has been focused on the accompanying intracellular processes. The focus of the attention has been on the irreversible growth arrest and two important physiological functions that rely on it: suppression of carcinogenesis due to the proliferation loss of damaged cells, and the acceleration of organism aging due to the deterioration of the tissue repair mechanism with age. However, the advances of the past years have revealed that senescent cells can impact the surrounding …

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Cancer Invasion: Patterns and Mechanisms Creative Commons
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Krakhmal N.V., Siberian State Medical University
Zavyalova M.V. Siberian State Medical University; Tomsk Cancer Research Institute; Tomsk State University
ACTA NATURAE, Journal Year: 2015, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 17 - 28

Published: Jan. 1, 2015

Cancer invasion and the ability of malignant tumor cells for directed migration and metastasis have remained a focus of research for many years. Numerous studies have confirmed the existence of two main patterns of cancer cell invasion: collective cell migration and individual cell migration, by which tumor cells overcome barriers of the extracellular matrix and spread into surrounding tissues. Each pattern of cell migration displays specific morphological features and the biochemical/molecular genetic mechanisms underlying cell migration. Two types of migrating tumor cells, mesenchymal (fibroblast-like) and amoeboid, are observed in each pattern of cancer cell invasion. This review describes the key …

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Bryzgunova O.E., Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Laktionov P.P. Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences; E.N. Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology
ACTA NATURAE, Journal Year: 2015, Volume and Issue: 7(3), P. 48 - 54

Published: Jan. 1, 2015

Cell-free nucleic acids (cfNA) may reach the urine through cell necrosis or apoptosis, active secretion of nucleic acids by healthy and tumor cells of the urinary tract, and transport of circulating nucleic acids (cir-NA) from the blood into primary urine. Even though urinary DNA and RNA are fragmented, they can be used to detect marker sequences. MicroRNAs are also of interest as diagnostic probes. The stability of cfNA in the urine is determined by their structure and packaging into supramolecular complexes and by nuclease activity in the urine. This review summarizes current data on the sources of urinary cfNA, their …

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