Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education

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2015

Carley Fisher-Maltese, George Mason University
Timothy D. Zimmerman Hampshire College
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2015, Volume and Issue: 10(1), P. 51 - 66

Published: Jan. 10, 2015

Recently, schools nationwide have expressed a renewed interest in school gardens, viewing them as innovative educational tools. Most of the scant studies on these settings investigate the health/nutritional impacts, science learning potential, or emotional dispositions of students. However, few studies examine the shifts in attitudes that occur for students as a result of experiences in school gardens. The purpose of this mixed method study was to examine a school garden program at a K-3 elementary school. Our study sought to demonstrate the value of garden-based learning through a focus on measures of learning typically associated with the informal learning environment. …

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51-66

Arthur Louis Odom, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Clare Valerie Bell University of Missouri-Kansas City
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2015, Volume and Issue: 10(1), P. 87 - 97

Published: Jan. 10, 2015

The purpose of this study was to examine the association of middle school student science achievement and attitudes about science with student-reported frequency of teacher lecture demonstrations and student-centered learning. The student sample was composed of 602 seventh- and eighth-grade students enrolled in middle school science. Multiple regression was used to investigate the association of attitudes toward science, student-centered learning, and teacher demonstrations with science achievement. Both attitudes toward science and student-centered learning were positively associated with science achievement, and student-centered learning was positively associated with attitude toward science. Teacher demonstrations were found to have a negative association with student …

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87-97

Nejla Gultepe, Dumlupinar University
Ziya Kilic Gazi University
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2015, Volume and Issue: 10(1), P. 111 - 132

Published: Jan. 10, 2015

This study was conducted in order to determine the differences in integrated scientific process skills (designing experiments, forming data tables, drawing graphs, graph interpretation, determining the variables and hypothesizing, changing and controlling variables) of students (n = 17) who were taught with an approach based on scientific argumentation and of students (n = 17) who were taught with a traditional teaching approach in Grade 11 chemistry. The study was conducted at a high school in Çankırı, Turkey. A multiformat Scientific Process Skills Scale was administered to both groups as a pre- and posttest; it contained 29 items in 5 modules …

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111-132

2014

Mahsa Kazempour Penn State University-Berks Campus, Department of Elementary Education, P. O. Box 7009, Tulpehocken Road-Gaige 236, Reading, PA, USA. E-Mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2014, Volume and Issue: 9(1), P. 77 - 96

Published: Jan. 10, 2014

The case study reported in this paper is part of a larger multiple cross case analysis focusing on pre-service teachers with various initial confidence and attitudes toward science and science teaching. In this paper, the focus will be on one elementary teacher candidate, Lisa, who began the science methods course with a negative attitude and low self-efficacy. An in-depth description of her beliefs, attitude, and self-efficacy, before and after the course, the impact of her prior science experience and the science methods course on shaping these domains, and the possible interrelationship between the three variables are discussed. The findings revealed …

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77-96

Nermin Bulunuz Uludağ Universitesi
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2014, Volume and Issue: 9(2), P. 215 - 234

Published: April 10, 2014

This study investigates noise pollution levels in two elementary schools. Also, “noise level awareness and sensitivity training” was given for reducing noise pollution, and the effects and results of this training were evaluated. ‘Sensitivity’ training was given to 611 students and 48 teachers in a private and a public school. Questionnaires, sound meter observations, and the reflections of the student teachers participating in the study were used for collecting data. The findings showed that noise levels measured in both schools were much higher than national and international upper limits. The data obtained through the first questionnaire indicated that students and …

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215-234

Marc Behrendt, Ohio University
Teresa Franklin Ohio University
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2014, Volume and Issue: 9(3), P. 235 - 245

Published: July 7, 2014

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of science field trips as educational tools to connect students to classroom concepts. Experiential learning at formal and informal field trip venues increases student interest, knowledge, and motivation. The teacher's role in preplanning, implementation, and reflection often dictates the impact that the field trip will have on students. Science teacher education programs do not traditionally instruct preservice teachers how to plan or coordinate a field trip. Once teachers are empowered and learn how to develop and orchestrate a successful field trip, they will enable students to develop interest in science, …

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235-245

Hatice Sancar-Tokmak, Mersin University
Hikmet Surmeli, Mersin University
Sinan Ozgelen Mersin University
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2014, Volume and Issue: 9(3), P. 247 - 264

Published: July 7, 2014

The aim of this case study was to examine pre-service science teachers’ (PSTs) perceptions of their Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) development after creating digital stories based on science topics drawn from the national curriculum. A total of 21 PSTs enrolled in Introduction to Computers II participated in the study. Data were collected through a demographics questionnaire, a TPACK diagram, an open-ended questionnaire, interviews, and observations. During the study, feedback was provided to participants during each step of the digital storytelling process: writing the stories, finding related pictures, matching the pictures to the stories; and preparing the digital files. The …

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247-264

Mahsa Kazempour, DeSales University
Aidin Amirshokoohi DeSales University
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2014, Volume and Issue: 9(3), P. 285 - 309

Published: July 7, 2014

The literature on professional development is replete with studies that utilize survey, interview, and classroom observation data, primarily collected post professional development experience, to explore teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, and actions; however, we lack a clear understanding of teachers’ learning process and reflections during the professional development. The current study aims to address the abovementioned gaps in the literature, by utilizing participant reflections and assignments during a summer professional development opportunity, to elucidate the process by which teachers learn about inquiry-based teaching and begin to implement it in their planning, in addition to factors they deem influential in this process. The …

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285-309

Florence Le Hebel, Université Lyon1, UMR ICAR Ens Lyon, Lyon 2, CNRS
Pascale Montpied, CNRS, UMR ICAR Ens Lyon, Lyon 2, CNRS
Valérie Fontanieu Ifé, Ens Lyon
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2014, Volume and Issue: 9(3), P. 329 - 345

Published: July 7, 2014

The purpose of this study is to investigate the environmental attitudes (EA) in the population of 15-year-old French students and, to check if the French student population presents similar EA categorization as described in the different models in the literature (e.g. the Model of Ecological Values, Wiseman & Bogner 2003). The second aim of this study is to identify the different factors influencing students’ EA. We analyse the results of the questionnaire-based Relevance of Science Education Project carried out in France in 2008 as a part of a wider international comparative study ROSE (Relevance Of Science Education). The hierarchical ascendant …

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329-345

Daphne Goldman, Beit Berl Academic College
Bela Yavetz, Kibbutzim College of Education, Technology and the Arts
Sara Pe'er Oranim Academic College of Education
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2014, Volume and Issue: 9(4), P. 369 - 383

Published: Nov. 10, 2014

In light of the crucial role of teacher education in transforming education and society so that a sustainable future is possible, there is increasing interest in the relationship between academic major and development of student teachers’ environmental literacy (EL). Since science disciplines are the common framework for incorporating environmental education, this longitudinal study investigated, in a paired pretest-posttest design, if student teachers majoring in the environment-related disciplines differ in the development of their EL from other majors. The differences in EL-variables between the two groups were enhanced during studies only in particular behavioral aspects (recycling efforts and citizenship action) and …

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369-383

2013

Buket Yakmaci-Guzel, Assistant Professor at the Department of Secondary School Science and Mathematics Education, Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey. Her research interests include science/chemistry education; conceptual understanding in science/chemistry; preservice and inservice teacher education; pedagogical content knowledge of science/chemistry teachers; nature of science. Correspondence: Bogazici University, Faculty of Education, Secondary School Science and Mathematics Education Department, 34342, Bebek, Istanbul, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Emine Adadan Assistant Professor at the Department of Secondary School Science and Mathematics Education, Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey. She received her PhD in science education from the Ohio State University in the United States. Her research interests involve students’ science learning through multiple representations and preservice science teacher education with special focus on content and pedagogical content knowledge. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(1), P. 109 - 130

Published: Jan. 10, 2013

The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in 19 preservice chemistry teachers’ understandings of the structure of matter, including the aspects of the physical states of matter, the physical composition of matter, and the chemical composition of matter, before, immediately after, and months after they received a specific instruction. The one-group pre, post, and delayed posttest design was used, and participants’ understandings before, immediately after, and months after the instruction were assessed using the same “three part particulate drawing” classification question constructed by Sanger (2000). Collected data were analyzed according to both the number of scientifically appropriate …

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109-130

Yoon-Fah Lay, Senior Lecturer at School of Education and Social Development, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Saba Malaysia. Correspondence: School of Education and Social Development, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia. Email: [email protected]
Chwee-Hoon Khoo, Lecturer at Teacher Education Institute (Kent Campus), P.O. Box No.2, 89207 Tuaran, Sabah, Malaysia
David F. Treagust, Professor in Science Education, Science and Mathematics Education Centre Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia. Email: [email protected]
A. L. Chandrasegaran Adjunct Research Fellow at Science and Mathematics Education Centre, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(1), P. 199 - 215

Published: Jan. 10, 2013

The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of energy literacy among 276 Form 2 (Grade 8) Malaysian students as no similar study has been previously conducted in the country, as well as the contribution of students’ energy-related knowledge and attitudes on their energy-related behaviors. This was a non-experimental quantitative research using the sample survey method to collect data by using the ‘Energy Literacy Questionnaire’ (ELQ). Independent samples t-test, Pearson product-moment correlation, and multiple linear regressions were used to analyse the data. The study found that levels of energy literacy were relatively low suggesting that the implemented curriculum …

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199-215

Sami Özgür Balikesir Üniversitesi, Necatibey Egitim Fakültesi, OFMA Egitimi Bölümü, Biyoloji A.B.D, E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(1), P. 255 - 268

Published: April 10, 2013

In this paper, it is aimed to investigate the persistence of misconceptions in the topic of the human blood circulatory system among students in different grade levels. For this reason, after discussions with biology educators, two tests consisting of open-ended questions were developed by the researcher and administered to students in four different grade levels. The first test was administered to 319 5th and 7th grade students in elementary school and the second one was administered to 400 1st and 4th year university students studying in the departments of elementary school teaching, science education and biology education. Data were analyzed …

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255-268

Erin Redman Recently completed her doctorate at the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University. She has accepted a professor/research position at Escuela Nacional de Estudios Superiores-UNAM, Unidad León (México), where she will be collaboratively developing their new sustainability undergraduate program. Correspondence: Arizona State University, School of Sustainability. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(1), P. 1 - 34

Published: Jan. 10, 2013

Achieving a sustainable future requires that individuals adopt sustainable behaviors, which are often learned and cemented at a young age. Yet, traditional education efforts have been inadequate in fostering transformative change, in part because many programs focus on fact-heavy, teacher-centered techniques while neglecting the practices that behavioral and sustainability scholars highlight as central to creating change. To address this gap, the present research integrates three critical yet mostly disparate bodies of research— educational pedagogy, behavior change, and sustainability competencies. This interdisciplinary approach to education was implemented and evaluated with a small group of students during an intensive summer program and …

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1-34

Vasilia Christidou, Professor at the University of Thessaly, Greece. Her research interests include teaching and learning in science, the promotion of Public Understanding of Science, and the process of recontextualization of scientific texts addressed to non-experts. Correspondence: Department of Preschool Education, University of Thessaly, Argonafton & Filellinon, 38221, Volos, Greece. E-mail: [email protected]
Irida Tsevreni, Environmentalist and holds a PhD on children’s participation in urban planning. She is a post postdoctoral researcher at the School of Architecture, National Technical University of Athens. Her research interests include children’s participation in urban and regional planning, children’s involvement in the design of their play spaces, environmental education and critical pedagogy. Email: [email protected]
Maria Epitropou, Kindergarten teacher and holds a Master’s Degree in Education. She has participated in several research projects on the development of educational material and software. E-mail: [email protected]
Constantinos Kittas Professor. Constantinos Kittas, PhD in Thermodynamics is an Agricultural, Civil and Mechanical Engineer. He has more than 30 years of extensive research and teaching involvement in Agricultural Engineering, Bioclimatology and Renewable Energy Sources. He has coordinated and participated in several R&D projects and has more than 200 publications. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(1), P. 59 - 83

Published: Jan. 10, 2013

The present study explores the use of a conventional school ground of a primary school and its potential as a space for creative play and environmental learning. Children’s play behavior and views of the school ground are explored, as well as their vision for its improvement. The research constitutes part of a wider school ground project and was carried out in a primary school in Volos city, Greece, during the 2010-2011 schoolyear. Geographical and participatory design methods were used that capture children’s experience of space and their will for participation in redesigning their school ground. They included mapping of the …

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59-83

Pei-Ying Tsai, Doctoral student in the Graduate Institute of Science Education at the National Changhua University of Education, Taiwan
Sufen Chen, Associate Professor in the Graduate Institute of Digital Learning and Education at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
Huey-Por Chang, Professor and President at the Open University of Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Wen-Hua Chang Associate Professor in the Graduate Institute of Science Education at the National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan. Correspondence: Graduate Institute of Science Education at the National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(1), P. 85 - 107

Published: Jan. 10, 2013

Science teachers frequently select science news articles as supplementary teaching materials; however, the literature indicates that students encounter difficulties in examining and evaluating the news content and textual elements. This paper reports an instructional strategy of utilizing science news articles and investigates its effectiveness in enhancing students’ cognitive learning outcomes. In this quasi-experimental study, 118 seventh graders from four classes in one secondary school in Taiwan took part in the Science News Instruction (SNI). After eight weeks of instruction about Genetics and Reproduction, all students were requested to present their written arguments to the selected science news article. Two of …

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85-107

Elvan Sahin Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Education, Department of Elementary Education, Ankara, TURKEY, e-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(2), P. 269 - 283

Published: April 10, 2013

The present study aimed to explain elementary teacher candidates’ energy conservation behaviors by using Value-Belief-Norm (VBN) Theory. Participants in this study were 512 students at Faculty of Education from two public universities in Turkey. Of the 512 students, 35.5% were enrolled in the early childhood education program, 30.9% were in the elementary science education program, and 27.7% were in the elementary mathematics education program. The rest of the participants were pursuing a graduate program under the department of elementary education. The results of multiple linear regression analysis reflected that VBN Theory could successfully explain the participants’ energy conservation behaviors. The …

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269-283

Kristin Cook, Bellarmine University, 2001 Newburg Road, Louisville, KY 40205. Email: [email protected]
Cassie Quigley Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA. E-Mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(2), P. 339 - 357

Published: April 10, 2013

In this study, we investigated the ways in which university students connected with science through the use of photovoice (Wang & Burris, 1994) as a pedagogical tool. Results indicated that students came to appreciate their connections to the science that operates in their lives as they reflected on and became empowered with regard to the science content behind environmental issues of interest to them on campus. Photovoice allowed students to authentically inquire about local science, as well as the potential to generate change in their own community. This understanding is significant to science educators because first, it empowers learners to …

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339-357

Yannis Hadzigeorgiou, University of The Aegean
Michael Skoumios University of The Aegean
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(3), P. 405 - 426

Published: June 26, 2013

This paper focuses upon the problem of raising environmental awareness in the context of school science. By focusing, as it does, on the relationship between the self and the natural environment, the paper discusses the difficulties that exist, such as the students’ involvement with the natural world, as their object of study, the empirical treatment and the modeling of the natural world, and the purpose of learning science, as well as the possibilities for promoting the development of such relationship by keeping the natural world, as an object of study, in the foreground of the teachinglearning process. Such possibilities refer …

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405-426

Azra Moeed Victoria University of Wellington
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2013, Volume and Issue: 8(3), P. 537 - 559

Published: Oct. 10, 2013

Internationally, learning science through investigation is promoted as a preferred pedagogical approach. Research presented takes a view that such learning depends on how teachers understand science investigation. Teachers‘ understanding of science investigation was an aspect of an interpretive case study of the phenomenon of science investigation exploring the links between learning, motivation and assessment in year 11 science. Data were collected through a population survey of year 11 science teachers (n=165) in the greater Wellington region through a postal questionnaire (response rate 61%). In addition, all year 11 science teachers in a typical coeducational, middle size, urban secondary school were …

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537-559

2012

Oduola O Abiola, (PhD FIBMS FRMS FHEA) is senior lecturer at PAP Rashidah Sa'adatul Bolkiah Institute of Health Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam. He is a Chair of Undergraduate Biomedical Science Research. His research interest is neuroscience, memory and Ageing. Correspondence: Oduola O Abiola, PAPRSBIHS, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam [email protected]
Harkirat S Dhindsa ED. D. (Science Education) from Teachers College, Columbia University, NY, USA and Ph. D. (Chemistry) from University of Western Sydney, Australia. He has extensive teacher training experience and has published over 100 papers including in reputed international journals. He has excelled through the ranks to professorship at Universiti Brunei Darussalam. His research interests include culture and education, technology in education, curriculum development and students memory organisation. Correspondence: SHBIE, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(1), P. 71 - 81

Published: Jan. 10, 2012

During the last decade of the 20th century (the decade of the brain) large sums of money were spent in researching how the brain works in relation to our day-to-day activities. As a result, we now know to a much greater extent the roles played by various regions of the brain when we are carrying out various activities including learning. We also know that different types of rewards and instruments can stimulate specific parts of the brain which enable individuals to carry out their daily chores efficiently. These findings when applied to a classroom learning situation, which is a step …

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71-81

Hélène Lalancette, PhD Candidate and Research Associate, Educational Neuroscience Laboratory, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University. Ms. Lalancette's current research focuses on defining the fields of educational neuroethics in philosophy of education as a response to the increasing application of neurotechnology in education. She is actively involved in pre-teacher training/Science Education and currently in charge of Instructional Engineering for the Distant Learning Science Program of the SD No. 93 in Vancouver, British Colombia, Canada. Correspondence: Simon Fraser University, Canada. E-mail: [email protected]
Stephen R. Campbell Associate Professor and Director, Educational Neuroscience Laboratory, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University. Dr. Campbell’s scholarly focus is on the historical and psychological development of cognition and learning from an embodied perspective, inspired and informed by the work of Kant, Husserl, Piaget, Merleau-Ponty, and Francisco Varela. Accordingly, his research incorporates methods of psychophysiology and cognitive neuroscience as a means for operationalizing affective and cognitive models of anxiety and concept formation
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(1), P. 37 - 52

Published: Jan. 10, 2012

Research design and methods in educational neuroscience involve using neuroscientific tools such as brain image technologies to investigate cognitive functions and inform educational practices. The ethical challenges raised by research in social neuroscience have become the focus of neuroethics, a sub-discipline of bioethics. More specifically here, we give an overview of neuroethical issues arising from brain imaging studies and neuropharmacology in education, from neuromyths to potential stigmatization of learners, and discuss the relevance of establishing the field of educational neuroethics. We argue that by integrating ethical positions to research design and methods in educational neuroscience, it would become possible to …

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37-52

Salmiza Saleh (PhD) currently works as a senior lecturer at the School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, and is responsible for the course of Physics Teaching Method and several other courses in science education, for both undergraduate and postgraduate students. She is also a researcher on science education, focusing on physics instructional methods, brain based teaching and learning strategies, studies in energy as well as mathematics education. In addition, she also supervises postgraduate students and coordinates several university research projects related to these areas of studies. Correspondence: School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang, Malaysia. E-mail: [email protected]my
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(1), P. 107 - 122

Published: Jan. 10, 2012

The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of Brain Based Teaching Approach in enhancing students’ scientific understanding of Newtonian Physics in the context of Form Four Physics instruction. The technique was implemented based on the Brain Based Learning Principles developed by Caine & Caine (1991, 2003). This brain compatible strategy involves specific attention and consideration towards seven main steps; (i) Activation, (ii) Clarify the outcome and paint big picture of the lesson, (iii) Making connection, (iv) Doing the learning activity, (v) Demonstrate student understanding, (vi) Review for student recall and retention and (vii) Preview the new topic. …

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107-122

Umesh Ramnarain Dr, Senior Lecturer, Department of Science and Te University of Johannesburg, South Africa chnology Education Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 361 - 363

Published: April 10, 2012

Book review Metacognition in Science Education

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361-363

Dr. Bulunuz Assistant Professor of Elementary Education with a specialty in science education. His research interests are: inquiry science education, project-based learning, development of interest and motivation in science, integration of science and play in preschool, and argumentation in science education. Correspondence: Uludağ University, Education Faculty, A Block, No:217, Gorukle Campus, 16059, Nilufer, Bursa, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 141 - 166

Published: April 10, 2012

This research studied the development of preservice teachers’ understandings and attitudes about teaching science through playful experiences. Subjects were 94 senior preservice teachers in two sections of a science methods class on teaching preschool children. Data sources were semi-structured interviews and open-ended questionnaire at the beginning and end of the semester, students’ reflections on their field placement implementation, and a Playful Science Survey. At the beginning of the course, preservice teachers perceived teaching science through play primarily as drama and puppetry and saw it as an instrument for teaching, demonstrating, having fun, making competition, and making learning easier. At the …

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141-166

Astrid Steele Assistant Professor Schulich School of Education Nipissing University Ontario, Canada Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 365 - 367

Published: April 10, 2012

Book review The Inclusion of Environmental Education in Science Teacher Education

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365-367

Brian T. Gautreau, info is as follows: Correspondence: 1246 Westchester Dr. Baton Rouge, LA 70810. Email: [email protected], [email protected]
Ian C. Binns Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Science Education, UNC Charlotte, Department of Reading & Elementary Education, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 167 - 195

Published: April 10, 2012

Student attitudes toward science and content achievements were examined in three secondary Biology I classrooms using an environmentally place-based curriculum as well as a traditional curriculum. Student attitudes were measured using Likert-scale science attitude surveys administered at the beginning of the school year and once again following completion of weeklong ecology curricula. Content achievements were assessed on a pre- and post-test as well as an end-of-unit test. The quantitative results show some attitude measures are correlated with ability-group tracking, and that little change in science attitudes occurred during the course of the study for the three groups. Results also indicate …

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167-195

Abdullah Ambusaidi, Sultan Qaboos University, Sultanate
Edward Boyes, University of Liverpool. E-mail: [email protected]
Martin Stanisstreet, University of Liverpool. E-mail: [email protected]
Neil Taylor University of New England. Australia. Correspondence: School of Education, University of New England. Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 233 - 251

Published: April 10, 2012

A 44-item questionnaire was employed to determine pre-service teachers’ beliefs about how useful various specific actions might be in helping to reduce global warming, their willingness to undertake these same actions, and the extent to which these two might be related. The instrument was administered to pre-service science teachers (n=104) at the Sultan Qaboos University in the Sultanate of Oman. The findings indicate that the majority of these Omani pre-service science teachers believed that global warming and associated climate change is happening now and they are concerned about it. Furthermore, they are aware of the measures that individuals could take …

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233-251

Jan Oakley Contract lecturer in the Faculty of Education and Department of Women’s Studies at Lakehead University. Her research and teaching interests include humane and social justice pedagogies. Correspondence: Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, P7B 5E1. E-mail [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 253 - 267

Published: April 10, 2012

This study investigated Ontario science and biology teachers’ practices and attitudes toward animal dissection and dissection alternatives. The data was collected through a mixed methods approach involving online surveys (n=153) and subsequent telephone interviews (n=9) with secondary school science and biology teachers. The findings indicate that teachers identify strengths and drawbacks to both dissection and alternatives, but the majority continue to strongly favour traditional dissection and see it as vital to biology education. Further, although teachers expressed concerns with dissection, their concerns were overshadowed by an overall dissatisfaction with alternatives. It is argued that teachers need to engage more deeply …

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253-267

Maria Daskolia, Lecturer in Environmental Education and senior researcher in the Environmental Education Lab with the Faculty of Philosophy, Pedagogy and Psychology at the University of Athens (Greece). Her current research interests focus on the enhancement of creativity through environmental education and education for sustainable development activities; and on the use of digital tools and constructionist learning environments to support innovative environmental education school and teacher education practices. Correspondence: National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Philosophy, Department of Pedagogy, University Campus – Philosophiki, 15784 Ilissia – Greece. E-mail: [email protected]
Athanasios Dimos, PhD candidate at the Department of Preschool Education of the University of Athens (Greece). His research focuses on the potential of project-based learning for the enhancement of creative thinking
Panagiotis G. Kampylis PhD from the University of Jyväskylä (Finland) on the role of teachers in fostering creative thinking. He is currently among the scientific staff of the Information Society Unit of the EC Institute for Prospective Technological Studies
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 269 - 290

Published: April 10, 2012

Creative thinking in Environmental Education (EE) remains greatly under researched topic. Research on teachers’ conceptions of creative thinking within EE context is also limited, although their role in facilitating creative thinking in students is well documented. The small-scale qualitative study presented here investigates Greek secondary teachers’ conceptions of creative thinking in EE. Empirical data were collected based on nonstructured interviews with 20 secondary teachers with diverse backgrounds and subject expertise. Among the findings of the study is that participants view creative thinking as a thinking process that can or should be enhanced within the context of EE. All four key …

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269-290

Abdullah Ambusaidi, Sultan Qaboos University, Sultanate
Edward Boyes, University of Liverpool. E-mail: [email protected]
Martin Stanisstreet, University of Liverpool. E-mail: [email protected]
Neil Taylor University of New England. Australia. Correspondence: School of Education, University of New England. Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(2), P. 291 - 311

Published: April 10, 2012

This is a longitudinal study aimed at revealing the beliefs of prospective science teachers in the College of Education at Sultan Qaboos University/Sultanate of Oman about science teaching. To achieve this aim a Draw-A-Science-Teacher-Test Checklist (DASTT-C) tool was used. The study sample consisted of (45) prospective science teachers in the College of Education at Sultan Qaboos University. The instrument was applied to the sample three times: before the Science Method I course, after finishing this course and after finishing the Science Method II course and the Practicum. The results revealed that after completing the Science Methods I course, prospective science …

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291-311

Vanessa L. Wyss, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Pedagogy at Ball State University, United States of America. Her research interests include, student interest in STEM, gender issues in STEM, middle level learners. Correspondence: Ball State University, Department of Educational Studies, Muncie, IN 47306, United States. E-mail: [email protected]
Diane Heulskamp, Assistant Professor of Education at Wright State Univerity Lake Campus. Her research interests include student interest in STEM. Wright State University Lake Campus, Education and Sciences, Celina, OH 45822, United States. E-mail: [email protected]
Cathy J. Siebert Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Pedagogy at Ball State University, United States of America. Her research interests include teacher preparation and professional development partnerships. She has served as a Professional Development School liaison since 1999. Ball State University, Department of Educational Studies, Muncie, IN 47306, United States. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(4), P. 501 - 522

Published: Oct. 10, 2012

Students are making choices in middle school that will impact their desire and ability to pursue STEM careers. Providing middle school students with accurate information about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) careers enables them to make more knowledgeable choices about courses of study and career paths. Practical ways of helping students understand the nature of science careers are limited. This study investigates using video interviews of STEM professionals as a method for better informing students about STEM career possibilities. ANCOVA analysis was used to compare treatment and comparison student interest in pursuing STEM careers before and after viewing video interviews …

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501-522

Aydın Kizilaslan, Research assistant at the Department of Secondary Science & Mathematics Education in Kazım Karabekir Education Faculty. His research interest is inquirybased chemistry education. Correspondence: Atatürk University, Kazım Karabekir Education Faculty, Erzurum, Turkey. Email: [email protected]
Mustafa Sozbilir, Associate Professor at the Department of Secondary Science & Mathematics Education in Kazım Karabekir Education Faculty. His research interests are teacher training, curriculum evaluation, students’ learning in science/chemistry, concept learning and teaching in science, context-based teaching, problem/project-based learning, inquiry based-science learning and undergraduates’ understandings of chemical ideas in thermodynamics and students’ misconceptions.Email: [email protected]
M. Diyaddin Yaşar PhD, is a researcher at the Department of Secondary Science & Mathematics Education in Kazım Karabekir Education Faculty. His research interest is curriculum evaluation in chemistry at secondary level. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(4), P. 599 - 617

Published: Oct. 11, 2012

Inquiry-based learning [IBL] enhances students’ critical thinking abilities and help students to act as a scientist through using scientific method while learning. Specifically, inquiry as a teaching approach has been defined in many ways, the most important one is referred to nature of constructing knowledge while the individuals possess a question about natural worlds and explore the answers for the questions. The aim of this content analysis study was to analyze research related to inquiry based teaching through published research reports in the form of full papers and theses by Turkish researchers. For these purpose national and international journals and …

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599-617

Elvan Sahin, Instructor in Elementary Science Education at Middle East Technical University, Turkey. She received her Ph.D. (2008) in Secondary Science and Mathematics Education from Middle East Technical University. Her main research interest is education for sustainable development. Correspondence: Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Education, Dept. of Elementary Education, 06531 Ankara, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Hamide Ertepinar, Professor at İstanbul Aydın University, Turkey. She received her Ph.D. (1985) in Chemistry from Middle East Technical University. Her main research interests are students’ conceptions of science, misconceptions in chemistry and science education, conceptual change, and environmental education
Gaye Tuncer Teksoz Associate professor in environmental and sustainability education at Elementary Education Department of Middle East Technical University. She has MS and PhD degrees in environmental engineering and associated professorship in Science education. She is a member of UNESCO MaB Experts Committee of Turkey
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(4), P. 459 - 478

Published: June 4, 2012

The purpose of this study is to construct a structural equation model to examine the links among attitudes, values, and behaviors pertaining to sustainability, participation in outdoor recreation as well as gender and tendency to follow mass media for university students. The data were collected by on-line administration of a survey to 958 students at Middle East Technical University during February-June of 2008. It needs to be stressed that gender emerged as a strong factor explaining sustainability-related attributes. It was reflected that female students having higher tendency to follow media held more favorable attitudes and behaviors toward sustainable life styles, …

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459-478

Maria Ojala PhD in psychology and is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Education, Uppsala University, Sweden. Her main research interests lie in the intersection between environmental psychology and education for sustainable development with a special focus on emotions and coping. Her latest publications are in Journal of Environmental Psychology, Environmental Education Research, and Environmental Values. Correspondence: Maria Ojala, Department of Education, Uppsala University, SE-750 02 Uppsala, Sweden. Phone: +46 18 471 24 22; E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2012, Volume and Issue: 7(4), P. 537 - 561

Published: Oct. 10, 2012

Learning about global problems, such as climate change, is not only a cognitive endeavor, but also involves emotions evoked by the seriousness and complexity of these problems. Few studies, however, have explored how young people cope with emotions related to climate change. Since coping strategies could be as important as the emotions themselves in influencing whether young people will acquire knowledge concerning climate change, as well as ethical sensibility and action competence, it is argued that it is important for teachers to gain insight into how young people cope with this threat. Thus, the aim of this study was to …

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537-561

2011

Haluk Özmen Associate Professor of Chemistry Education in the Faculty of Fatih Education at Karadeniz Technical University, Turkey. His main research interests are chemistry education, science education, teacher education, computer-assisted teaching. Correspondence: Karadeniz Technical University, Fatih Faculty of Education, Department of Science Education, 61335, Söğütlü-Akçaabat, Trabzon, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected], [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(1), P. 99 - 121

Published: Jan. 10, 2011

This study was conducted to determine 4th, 5th, and 6th grade primary students‟ conceptions about the particulate nature of matter in daily-life events. Five questions were asked of students and interviews were used to collect data. The interviews were conducted with 12 students, four students from each grade, after they finished the formal courses related to the particulate nature of matter. The results show that the understanding level of students in all grades about the microscopic properties of matter was quite low. They have little knowledge of or alternative conceptions about the microscopic properties of the particles such as the …

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99-121

Dr. Astrid Steele Assistant Professor in the Schulich School of Education at Nipissing University in North Bay, Ontario Canada. Her research interests focus on the intersection of environmental and secondary science teaching and learning. Correspondence: Nipissing University, 100 College Drive, Box 5002, North Bay ON, Canada P1B 8L. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(1), P. 1 - 22

Published: Jan. 10, 2011

Traditional secondary science education draws on markedly different pedagogies than those made use of in contemporary environmental education, therefore, embedding environmental education within secondary science curriculum presents both epistemological and practical difficulties for teachers. This ethnographic study examines the work of six secondary science teachers in Northern Ontario, Canada, as they engage in an action research project focused on merging environmental education in their science lessons. Over the course of five months the teachers examine and discuss their views and their professional development related to the project. In the place of definitive conclusions, six propositions relating the work of secondary …

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1-22

Mijung Kim Assistant professor at the University of Victoria, Canada. Her research interests include STSE (Science, Technology, Society, and the Environment) issues in science education and science inquiry in local context. Correspondence: The Department of Curriculum and Instruction, MacLaurin Building, University of Victoria, Canada. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(1), P. 23 - 37

Published: Jan. 10, 2011

Despite inquiry-based teaching was introduced and encouraged as significant tool to develop students‘ scientific knowledge and habits of mind, its implementation has not been well established in science classrooms in Korea. To understand the challenges and difficulties of the practice of inquiry practical work, this study particularly aims to understand how pre-service teachers‘ understandings of inquiry and practical work have been shaped in educational and social contexts in Korea and later how their views and willingness could be developed through redesigning and practicing textbook activities. 25 third-year students in an elementary science methods course in Korea participated in the study. …

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23-37

Georgia Liarakou, Assistant Professor at the Pedagogical Department of Primary Education, University of the Aegean, Greece. She teaches Environmental Education and Education for Sustainable Development. Email: [email protected]
Ilias Athanasiadis, Associate Professor at the Pedagogical Department of Primary Education, University of the Aegean, Greece. He teaches Social Research Methods. Email: [email protected]
Costas Gavrilakis PhD, is a researcher of Environmental Education and Education for Sustainable Development at the University of the Aegean, Greece. Correspondence: University of the Aegean, University Hill, 81100 Mytilene, Greece. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(1), P. 79 - 98

Published: Jan. 10, 2011

The purpose of this study was to investigate what Greek secondary school students (grades 8 and 11) believe about the greenhouse effect and climate change. A total of 626 students completed a closed-form questionnaire consisting of statements regarding the causes, impacts and solutions for this global environmental issue. The possible influence of three factors – i.e. educational level, gender and previous participation in Environmental Education extracurricular programs – on students‟ ideas was examined. The results suggest that eleventh graders were much better informed than eighth graders although some of the misconceptions reported in the literature (such as the cause-effect relationship …

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79-98

Dr. Vasilia Christidou Associate Professor at the University of Thessaly, Greece. Her research interests include teaching and learning in science, the promotion of Public Understanding of Science, and the process of recontextualization of scientific texts addressed to non-experts. Correspondence: Department of Preschool Education, University of Thessaly, Argonafton & Filellinon, 38221, Volos, Greece. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(2), P. 141 - 159

Published: April 10, 2011

During the last decades students‟ science-related interests, attitudes, and images of science and scientists, and their differentiations according to gender, culture, and socio-economic status have been investigated by a multitude of research studies. These aspects of students‟ voices seem to be interrelated and to also affect students‟ achievement in science and their relevant study and career aspirations. Moreover, school science and teachers, as well as popular science are considered as factors determining students‟ voices. This paper attempts a mapping of relevant literature in order to highlight crucial outcomes and draw educational and research implications. It is suggested that a comprehensive …

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141-159

Dr. Ron Wagler, Assistant Professor of Science Education at the University of Texas at El Paso where he teaches undergraduate and graduate science and environmental education courses. His current research interests include human beliefs and attitudes toward other animals; teacher efficacy; environmental education; scientific inquiry; educational outreach with arthropods; evolution education; and Madagascar hissing cockroach curriculum development. Correspondence: The University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Teacher Education, 500 West University Avenue, Education Building 601, El Paso, TX 79968, US. E-mail: [email protected]
Dr. Amy Wagler Assistant Professor of Statistics at the University of Texas at El Paso. She teaches undergraduate and graduate statistics courses and statistical programming. Her current research interests include simultaneous inference in generalized linear model settings, multiple comparison procedures for categorical data settings and measurement models, bias reduction procedures for generalized linear models, pedagogy methods for English Language Learners (ELLs) in introductory statistics and other statistics education topics
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(3), P. 229 - 250

Published: July 10, 2011

Invertebrates perform many beneficial and essential ecological services for humans. Despite this, the general public tends to view them negatively. Preservice elementary teachers often find themselves in a tenuous position because they possess the same negativity toward invertebrates as the general public but have been commissioned by United States of America national and state standards to teach their future students about the very invertebrates they distain. This study investigated the effect frequent direct contact with Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) in an educational setting had on preservice elementary teacher‟s arthropod (i.e., a subset of invertebrates) attitude and likelihood of arthropod …

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229-250

Christoph Randler, Professor for biology education at the University of Education Heidelberg. Correspondence: University of Education Heidelberg, Didactics of Biology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 561-2, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. E-mail: [email protected]
Eberhard Hummel, Staatliches Seminar für Schulpädagogik in Ludwigsburg. E-mail: [email protected]
Michaela Gläser-Zikuda, Professor at and Head of teh Lehrstuhl für Schulpädagogik at the University of Jena. E-mail: [email protected]
Franz X. Bogner, Professor of biology education at the University of Bayreuth. E-mail: [email protected]
Philipp Mayring Professor of psychology at the University of Klagenfurt, Austria and Associate Head of the Institute for Psychology and Head of the Department for Applied Psychology and Methodological Research. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(4), P. 359 - 370

Published: Oct. 10, 2011

Research has shown that emotions play a significant role in the learning process and academic achievement. However, the fact that measurement of emotions during or after instruction usually requires written responses on lengthy research instruments has been given as a reason why researchers have tended to avoid research on this topic in classrooms. Consequently, we developed a short Likert-scale instrument which used only three items within the three factors of interest, well-being and boredom to measure adolescent emotions during instruction in science education. We present four different studies in four populations to assess the validity of the scale. In order …

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359-370

Ingrid Glowinski, Researcher in biology education at the Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN) in Kiel, Germany. She has an academic background in biology and biology education and received her PhD in 2007. Correspondence: Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN) at the University of Kiel, Dept. of Biology Education, Olshausenstr. 62, D-24098 Kiel, Germany. E-mail: [email protected]
Horst Bayrhuber Professor for Biology Education. Until 2007, He was Head of the Biology Education Department at IPN, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education at the University of Kiel, Germany
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(4), P. 371 - 392

Published: Oct. 10, 2011

Student labs are out-of-school learning environments that are assumed to promote students‟ interest in science. They are characterised by aspects of situated and authentic learning, a prominence of application contexts presented by scientists, and a high amount of practical work. Research has shown the potential for promoting students‟ interest in science for each of these aspects when implemented separately as a teaching approach in science education. This study aims to explore, whether (i) these aspects can be shown to be separately effective on students‟ interest even when realised jointly in the learning environment and, if so, (ii) which reciprocal effects …

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371-392

Harkirat S Dhindsa, ED. D. (Science Education) from Teachers College, Columbia University, NT, USA and Ph. D. (Chemistry) from University of Western Sydney, Australia. He has extensive teacher training experience and has published over 100 papers including in reputed international journals. He has excelled through the ranks to professorship at Universiti Brunei Darussalam. His research interests include culture and education, technology in education, curriculum development and students memory organisation. Correspondence: SHBIE, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam. Email: [email protected]
Sharizal-Emran Master of Education from Universiti Brunei Darussalam. He was working as Chemistry teacher before he was appointed to the ICT Department, Ministry of Education, Brunei. He has been training teachers to use Interactive white board and his research interests are application of recent technology in education
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2011, Volume and Issue: 6(4), P. 393 - 414

Published: Oct. 11, 2011

In Brunei, more girls are enrolled at the institutions of higher education than boys. The aim of this study was to evaluate if a constructivist teaching approach, enriched with interactive whiteboard technology could empower males to minimize gender differences in achievement in Chemistry. Two groups of students were taught for six weeks: one group using the constructivist teaching approach enriched with interactive whiteboard technology and the other group using a traditional teaching approach. The results of the study demonstrated statistically significant gender differences in pre-test mean achievement scores of both the groups. There were statistically significant gender differences in post-test …

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393-414

2010

Mızrap Bulunuz, Asistant Professor of Elementary Education with a specialty in science education. His research interest are on inquiry science education, development of interest, motivation, integration of science and play in preschool, inquiry dialogue and argumentation in science education. Correspondence: Elementary Education Department, Education Faculty, Uludağ University, Bursa 16059, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]
Olga S. Jarrett Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education with a specialty in science education. Her research interests are on the role of play and playfulness in the development of interest in science. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(1), P. 65 - 84

Published: Jan. 10, 2009

Research on playfulness, science, and creativity suggests that there is a connection between having positive background experiences with science and the development of interest in science. However, there is little empirical research on where, how, and when teachers’ interests in science develop. The purpose of this research was to explore connections between preservice elementary teachers’ background science experiences and interest in science. Subjects were 53 preservice teachers in two sections of a science methods course. The data were collected by administering a self-report Science Background Experiences Survey. Students with low and high initial interest in science were significantly different on …

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65-84

Todd Campbell, Assistant Professor of Science Education in the School of Teacher Education and Leadership at Utah State University, USA. His main research interests are factors influencing current reform in science education, with specific interests in pre-service and inservice science teacher professional development. Correspondence: School of Teacher Education and Leadership, Utah State University, 2805 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah, USA. E-mail: [email protected]
William Medina-Jerez, Assistant Professor of Secondary Science and Environmental Education at the University of Wyoming, USA. His main research interests are cultural border crossing between students' worldviews and school science; science education for culturally diverse students; and science education in less developed countries. Email: [email protected]
Ibrahim Erdogan, Associate Professor of Science Education at Mus Alparslan University, Turkey. His main research interests include student and teacher actions in science classrooms facilitated with inquiry and STS instructional practices, teacher and students discourse skills and students social attitudes toward science. Email: [email protected]
Danhui Zhang Assistant Professor of Education Measurement at Beijing Normal University, China. Her main research interests focus on education measurement in science instruction with specific interests in student attitudes. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(1), P. 3 - 29

Published: Jan. 10, 2009

This study examined the similarities and differences among 171 Grade 7-12 science teachers from three different countries (54 U.S, 63 Bolivian, and 54 Turkish) with respect to their attitudes toward environmental education (EE) and instructional practices. The instrument employed explored how teachers‘ knowledge, instructional practices, decisionmaking process, and cultural features influenced their EE attitudes and praxis. The instrument, which was translated into Spanish and Turkish and then back into English, contained a personal data form that included demographic questions and a three-part questionnaire. Based on the analysis completed, significant differences were found between these three countries with respect to 1) …

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3-29

Zeki Arsal Assistant professor in Department of Educational Sciences at Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey. He received his PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from Abant Izzet Baysal University, Turkey. His main research interests are curriculum development and evaluation, teacher education and environmental education. Correspondence: Department of Educational Science, Faculty of Education, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected], [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(1), P. 85 - 103

Published: Sept. 10, 2010

This study examined the effect of diaries on self-regulation strategies of the pre-service science teachers. The participants of the study were 60 pre-service science teachers, 30 of which were in the experimental and the remaining 30 were in the control group. The Pintrich’s self-regulation model was taken as a basis in the study. The Pintrich’s model of self-regulation includes 3 general categories of strategies: (a) cognitive learning strategies, (b) metacognitive or self-regulatory strategies to control cognition, and (c) resource management strategies. In the study, the pre-service science teachers in the experimental group reported the self-regulation strategies they used for daily …

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85-103

Ayodeji P, Ifegbesan Lecturer in Department of Curriculum Studies & Instructional Technology, Faculty of Education, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria. He holds a Master degree in Social Studies Education and his about to complete his PhD at the School of Education, The University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. He has over 25 publications on teachers‘ preparation, gender, waste management and environmental education. His main research interests are on environmental conservation, environmental education, public awareness and sustainable development. Other research interest is in curriculum development and evaluation and gender related issues. Correspondence: Department of Curriculum Studies and Instructional Technology, Faculty of Education, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(2), P. 201 - 215

Published: April 10, 2010

This study examined the level of awareness, knowledge and practices of secondary schools students with regard to waste management. Few studies have captured waste management problems in Nigerian educational institutions, particularly the views of students. Using a structured, self-administered questionnaire, 650 students were surveyed from six secondary schools in two of the four educational zones of Ogun State. Data collected were subjected to percentage, mean, standard deviation, t-test and chi-square statistical analyses. Findings revealed that secondary school students from the sampled zones were aware of waste problems on their school compounds, but possessed poor waste management practices. The study showed …

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201-215

Gaye Teksoz, Part-time instructor in Elementary Science Education at Middle East Technical University, Turkey. She received her Ph.D. (1995) in Environmental Engineering from Middle East Technical University. Her main research interest is environmental education. Correspondence: Department of Elementary Education, Faculty of Education, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Elvan Sahin, Part-time instructor in Elementary Science Education at Middle East Technical University, Turkey. She received her Ph.D. (2008) in Secondary Science and Mathematics Education from Middle East Technical University. Her main research interest is education for sustainability
Hamide Ertepinar Professor in Elementary Science Education at Middle East Technical University, Turkey. She received her Ph.D. (1985) in Chemistry from Middle East Technical University. Her main research interests are students‟ conceptions of science, misconceptions in chemistry and science education, and conceptual change, and environmental education
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(2), P. 131 - 149

Published: April 10, 2010

The present study aimed to determine level of pre-service chemistry teachers‟ environmental literacy and their perceptions on environmental education. This study was realized during the fall semester of 2006-2007 academic year with the participation of 60 students enrolled in five-year chemistry teacher education program. The data collected by administration of Environmental Literacy Test and Environmental Education Perception Survey were analyzed by descriptive statistics and content analysis. The pre-service chemistry teachers strongly emphasized promotion of feelings of concern for the environment, development of awareness and sensitivity to the total environment, and gaining social values to protect the natural resources through teaching …

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131-149

Michael Braun, Research assistant and doing his PhD at the University of Heidelberg. The topics are the molecular phylogeny of parrots (Psittaciformes) and the breeding biology an introduced species, the Ring-necked Parakeet (Psittacula krameri). Correspondence: Institute of Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology, Department of Biology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Email: [email protected]
Regine Buyer, Works as a science-teacher at the Elisabeth-von-Thadden-Gymnasium (secondary school) in Heidelberg and as a choach in the Hector-Seminar. This is a project that enables scientifically or technically highly gifted students from the Heidelberg, Mannheim and Karlsruhe areas to further develop their abilities in addition to their normal school classes. Regine Buyer teaches children aged 10-19 years. She got her PhD in biology at the University of Freiburg im Breisgau. Her research interests are environmental education and teaching natural science. Email: [email protected]
Christoph Randler Professor at the University of Education in Heidelberg. He has an academic background in biological education and received his PhD in 2003. Main interests of research are educational evaluation and biology teaching. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(2), P. 151 - 168

Published: April 10, 2010

“Non-native organisms are a major threat to biodiversity”. This statement is often made by biologists, but general conclusions cannot be drawn easily because of contradictory evidence. To introduce pupils aged 11-14 years to this topic, we employed an educational program dealing with non-native animals in Central Europe. The pupils took part in a lesson giving general information about the topic, followed by a species identification quiz. Attitude, emotions and state of knowledge of each pupil were surveyed throughout the program using standardized questionnaires (pre-/post- and follow up tests). One week after the first lesson, a field trip followed, focusing on …

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151-168

James P. Lalley, Associate Professor of Education at D‟Youville College in Buffalo, NY and is the Director of Curriculum Development for Tactus Technologies. He has conducted multiple research studies in the area of adolescence science education and has also published on the topics of mastery learning and differentiated instruction. He received his doctorate in Educational Psychology from the University at Buffalo, NY in 1997. Email: [email protected]
Phillip Piotrowski Assistant Professor of Education at D‟Youville College in Buffalo, NY. He received his doctorate in Curriculum Planning from the University at Buffalo, NY in 1986. He has taught at the elementary and post-secondary levels for over 35 years. His previous research has been in the areas of the academic impact of all-day kindergarten, gender representation among elementary teachers, and adolescence science education. Correspondence: School of Education, D‟Youville College, 320 Porter Avenue, Buffalo, NY, 14201, USA. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(2), P. 189 - 200

Published: April 10, 2010

The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the effectiveness of virtual frog dissection using V-Frog© and physical frog dissection on learning, retention, and affect. Subjects were secondary students enrolled in year-long life science classes in a suburban high school (N=102). Virtual dissections were done with V-Frog©, a virtual reality software application that allows users to work with a virtual specimen that can be cut and explored in ways that are therefore unique for each individual user. The study employed a pretest, posttest, delayed posttest design using the pretest as a covariate in the analysis of the …

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189-200

Watcharee Ketpichainarong, Ph.D. in Science and Technology Education. She is a lecturerof Institute for innovative learning. Her main research interests are is to explore how to incorporate various effective teaching strategies into science contents. She currently work is to develop hand-on experiments aiming to promote scientific understanding as well as to organize teacher training workshop. She familiar with the use of inquiry approach and active learning strategies in the classroom. E-mail: [email protected]
Bhinyo Panijpan, Ph.D. Molecular Biophysics. He is the Director at the Institute for Innovative Learning, Mahidol University. His current research activities a program to support the education reform in Thailand with concrete examples on enhancement of profound and durable learning, creativity and communication skills in Thai students at all levels of ability and innovative research and development projects on science education with a special emphasis on learning processes to impact on teachers’ professional development countrywide and on national education policy. He also develop concrete models of integrated learning processes and topics at all levels of education for dissemination at community and national level as well as electronic multimedia with pedagogy content knowledge in science and mathematics topics for the secondary school students. E-mail: [email protected] mahidol.ac.th
Pintip Ruenwongsa Ph.D. in Biochemistry. She is the deputy director of IL and Chair of the Doctor of Philosophy Programme in Science and Technology Education of the Institute for Innovative Learning, Mahidol University. She currently work as organizer and group presenter of science lecture nationwide on biology, chemistry, physics and subjects needing integration of all these disciplines. Teaching/learning is done by using inquiry techniques without involving foreign nationals, therefore saving time and enhancing efficacy of communication. She also develop teaching/learning models, small apparatuses, interactive CDs with local relevance to enhance knowledge, skills, self-study and lifelong learning of junior high and high school students as well as teachers. Her main research are done by about 30 PhD students on Science and Technology Education) on various aspects of pedagology with special emphasis on construct teaching/learning hand-held models and laboratory experiments that increase scientific knowledge and skills that help both the learner and teacher to construct their deeper levels of knowledge. Correspondence: Institute for Innovative Learning, Mahidol University, 999 phuttamonthon 4 Rd., Salaya, Nakhonpathom, 73170, Thailand. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(2), P. 169 - 187

Published: April 10, 2010

This study explored the effectiveness of an inquiry-based cellulase laboratory unit in promoting inquiry in undergraduate students in biotechnology. The following tools were used to assess the students’ achievements and attitude: conceptual understanding test, concept mapping, students’ documents, CLES questionnaire, students’ self reflection, and interviews. Judging from their conceptual understanding test results and concept mapping, students gained significantly more content knowledge on enzyme-substrate interaction and its application. In addition, students’ reports on their projects revealed that they have developed their critical thinking, scientific process skills and abilities to apply knowledge on enzyme cellulase to industrial application. The students reacted positively …

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169-187

Mary M. Atwater, Professor of science education in the Office of Research, College of Education, at the University of Georgia. She holds a Ph.D. in science education and master‘s and bachelor degrees in chemistry. She is an inaugural fellow of the American Educational Research Association and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Her research focuses on socio-cultural-political factors that influence science teaching and learning. Correspondence: University of Georgia, College of Education, Office of Research, 376 Aderhold Hall, Athens, GA 30602-6007, USA. E-mail: [email protected]
Tonjua B. Freeman, Ph.D. candidate in the Science Education Program at The University of Georgia. She has a M. Ed. in Science Education from The University of Georgia and a B.S. in Science Teaching/Biological Sciences from Clemson University. Her dissertation explores the techniques employed by high school science teachers that help to increase the achievement levels of their Black students. Her contact information is as follows: The University of Georgia, Department of Mathematics and Science Education, 212 Aderhold Hall, Athens, GA 306027126, USA. E-mail: [email protected]
Malcolm B. Butler, Associate Professor of Science Education at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg, Florida. He earned his Ph.D. (1995) in Science Education from the University of Florida, USA. His research interests include multicultural science teacher education, writing to learn in science, and science content for elementary teachers. E-mail: [email protected]
Jessie Draper-Morris Graduated from The University of Georgia in 2000 with a B.S. Ed. and in 2005 with an M.A. Ed. in science education. She is currently a doctoral student at UGA in the Science Education Program focusing in inquiry in the context of biology teaching. She currently teaches advanced high school biology courses in the greater Atlanta-Metro area. Her contact information is as follows: The University of Georgia, Department of Mathematics and Science Education, 212 Aderhold Hall, Athens, GA 30602-7126, USA. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(3), P. 287 - 318

Published: July 10, 2010

The purpose of this explanatory case study using critical theory as a philosophical lens was to focus on two science teacher candidates‘ understandings of Otherness and their culturally responsive teaching (or the lack thereof) of students they believe are the ‗Others‘. The researchers found that even though the participants had different goals for their students, they were not responsive to some of their students because of the students‘ culture, race, and/or ethnicity. Both of the participants believed their science teacher education program had shortcomings and did not provide all of the needed experiences for them to be successful in their …

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287-318

Chantal Pouliot, Professor of science education. Correspondence: Département d'études sur l'enseignement et l'apprentissage, Faculté des sciences de l'éducation, 2320, rue des Bibliothèques Université Laval, Québec (Québec) Canada G1V 0A6. Email: [email protected]
Barbara Bader, Professor of science education. Département d'études sur l'enseignement et l'apprentissage, Faculté des sciences de l'éducation, 2320, rue des Bibliothèques, Université Laval, Québec (Québec) Canada G1V 0A6. Email: [email protected]
Geneviève Therriault Professor of science education. Département des sciences de l‟éducation Université du Québec à Rimouski, 300, allée des Ursulines, Rimouski (Québec) Canada G5L 3A1. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(3), P. 239 - 264

Published: July 10, 2010

This article pursues a dual objective. First, it seeks to present the notion of the relationship to knowledge as a valuable theoretical tool for science education research. Secondly, it aims to illustrate how this notion has been operationalized in recent research conducted in Quebec (Canada) that focuses on teachers‟ and students‟ relationship to knowledge. The first portion of this article presents the notion of the relationship to knowledge, documenting its origins, usefulness and contributions to research in the field of science education. In the second portion, we present four (4) studies recently conducted in Quebec that relied on the notion …

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239-264

Tesfeya Semela Currently a research fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in the Department of School Pedagogy, Institute of Educational Sciences, University of Tübingen, Germany. He is also associate professor of Education and Educational Psychology at Institute of Education, Training, and Research at Hawassa University, Ethiopia. E-Mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(3), P. 319 - 340

Published: July 10, 2010

This paper investigates the enrolment trends and the critical factors that impinge on students‟ choice of physics as major field of study. The data were generated from primary and secondary sources. Primary data was acquired based on a semi-structured interview with 14 sophomore and 11 senior students and five instructors of the department of physics at Hawassa University, Ethiopia. In addition, data on allocation of students to various major fields as well as quantitative data on academic achievement were obtained from the university‟s registar office. The results indicate that the rate of enrolment in physics is the lowest and applicants …

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319-340

Ron Wagler Assistant professor of science education at the University of Texas at El Paso. His research interests include human beliefs and attitudes toward other animals, teacher efficacy, environmental education, scientific inquiry, origins, evolution education, science teaching case narratives and Madagascar hissing cockroach curriculum development. Correspondence: The University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Teacher Education, 500 West University Avenue, Education Building, Room 601, El Paso, TX 79968-0574, USA. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(3), P. 353 - 375

Published: July 10, 2010

The purpose of this study was to assess the association between United States K-4 preservice teacher‟s attitudes toward specific animals and the likelihood that the preservice elementary teachers would incorporate these specific animals in their future science curriculum. A strong statistically significant association was found between the preservice elementary teacher‟s attitudes towards a specific animal and their likelihood to include or exclude that animal from their future science curriculum. Specifically, if a preservice elementary teacher had a positive attitude toward an animal they were much more likely to believe they would use that animal in their future science curriculum. Conversely, …

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353-375

Tom Puk Professor at the Faculty of Education, Lakehead University and teaches and conducts research in the area of ecological consciousness and ecological literacy
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(4), P. 461 - 476

Published: Oct. 10, 2010

In the Ontario publically-funded school system, there are no provincial curriculum guidelines or distinct courses for Ecological Literacy. Rather, the Ontario Ministry of Education policy is that “environmental education” should be taught in all grades and all existing subject matter. Because there are no specific Ecological Literacy courses in the provincial curriculum, few programs in Ontario Faculties of Education exist to train teachers in Ecological Literacy. Thus, in this study, we examined what incoming teachercandidates from various disciplinary backgrounds know about general concepts of Ecological Literacy, as the expectation is that all teachers should teach “environmental education” in whatever subject …

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461-476

Hunsik Kang, Assistant Professor of Chuncheon National University of Education, Korea. His main research interests are factors influencing pre-service and in-service science teacher professional development. Email: [email protected]
Lawrence C. Scharmann, Assistant Dean and Director of the School of Teacher Education at Florida State University, USA. His main research interests are nature of science, nature of theories, and understanding of instructional approaches to teaching evolutionary theory
Sukjin Kang, Associate Professor of Department of Science Education at Jeonju National University of Education, Korea. His main research interests are factors influencing science concept learning and processes of conceptual change, cooperative learning, and nature of science. Email: [email protected]
Taehee Noh Professor of Department of Chemistry Education at Seoul National University, Korea. His main interests are conceptual change, learning with analogies, and web-based instruction. Correspondence: Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-748, Korea. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(4), P. 383 - 405

Published: Sept. 1, 2010

In this study, we investigated the relationships among cognitive conflict and situational interest induced by a discrepant event, attention and effort allocated to learning, and conceptual change in learning the concept of density. Subjects were 183 seventh graders from six middle schools in Seoul, Korea. A preconception test, a test of responses to a discrepant event, and a questionnaire of situational interest were administered as pretests. Computer-assisted instruction was then provided to the students as a conceptual change intervention. Questionnaires regarding attention and effort, and a conception test were administered as posttests. The conception test was administered once more as …

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383-405

Ahmet Kılınç Ahmet Kılınç is an Assistan Professor of Elementary Science Education at Ahi Evran University, Turkey. He recieved his Ph.D. (2008) in Biology Education from Gazi University, Turkey. His main research areas are science education, public understanding of science, socioscientific issues, environmental education, teacher training, environmental psychology and risk psychology. Correspondence: Department of Elementary Education, Faculty of Education, Ahi Evran University, Kırsehir, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2010, Volume and Issue: 5(4), P. 495 - 509

Published: Oct. 10, 2010

According to environmental education scholars, most people do not use their environmental awareness to behave proenvironmentally. Scholars therefore believe that there is a gap between humans‟ cognitive and behavioural patterns. On one hand, a plethora of factors, such as religion, culture, self-efficacy, emotions, and so on, may be responsible for this gap. On the other hand, the ways we try to create environmental awareness may be problematic. The present study addresses the latter issue. Instead of conveying shallow environmental information, we foresaw that an action-oriented program would provide fruitful conclusions. To this end, the aim of this study was to …

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495-509

2009

Nasser Mansour Research fellow at School of Education and lifelong learning, University of Exeter, UK and a Lecturer in Science Education at the Faculty of Education, Tanta University, Egypt. His PhD in Science Education is from the School of Education and Lifelong Learning, University of Exeter. He originated the “Personal Religious Beliefs (PRB) Model”, which explains the process of shaping and reshaping teachers’ beliefs and practices. His main research interests are in aspects of teaching and learning in science, including STS (Science, Technology and Society education); controversial issues, scientific literacy, the relationship between religion and science education; learners’ ideas, misconceptions, alternative conceptions and alternative frameworks; constructivism in science education; learner thinking; creative thinking in science explanations in science; teaching about the nature of science; science teachers’ beliefs and practices, teacher professional development; Grounded Theory, E-learning, and e-argumentation. He published recently a book “Models of Understanding Science Teachers' Beliefs and Practices: Challenges and Potentials for Science Education” with issues related to STS Education, sociocultural contexts and personal religious beliefs. Correspondence: School of Education and Lifelong Learning, St. Luke’s Campus, Exeter University, Heavitree Road, Exeter, EX1 2LU, E-Mail: [email protected] , [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(1), P. 25 - 48

Published: Jan. 10, 2009

The study of teachers’ beliefs forms part of the process of understanding how teachers conceptualize their work which in turn is important to the understanding of teachers’ practices and their decisions in the classroom. A growing body of research argues that teachers’ beliefs should be studied within a framework that is aware of the influence of culture. These studies also argue that teachers’ beliefs and practices cannot be examined out of context. This shows that the relationship between teachers’ beliefs and their practices is complex and context dependent. Some researchers have found consistencies between teachers’ beliefs and their practices whilst …

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25-48

Chantal Pouliot Professor at the department of Études sur l’enseignement et l’apprentissage at Université Laval, Québec, Canada. She has an academic background in biology and in science education. She received her PhD in 2007. Correspondence: Département d’études sur l’enseignement et l’apprentissage, Université Laval, Pavillon des Sciences de l’Éducation, local 1126, Québec (Québec), G1K 7P4, Canada. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(1), P. 49 - 73

Published: Jan. 10, 2009

In the first part of this article I propose a conceptual framework – based on the deficit, public debate and co-production of knowledge models articulated by (Callon, 1999) – with which to examine students’ appropriation of de socioscientific issues (SSI). The second part of this article presents the way a group of three post-secondary/preuniversity students described the attitudes, interests and capacity for understanding of citizens concerned by the controversy surrounding the use of cellular telephones, and how they viewed the conditions under which citizens could contribute to public debates. This study was conducted on the basis of an ethnographic approach. …

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49-73

Pavol Prokop, Assistant professor in biology education at Trnava University, and is researcher at the Institute of Zoology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Slovakia. He received his PhD in Biology Education from Trnava University. His main research interests are students’ conceptions of science, biotechnology education, and alternative conceptions in biology and science education. He published many articles in science education journals such as International Journal of Science Education, Research in Science Education, Journal of Biological Education, International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, Journal of Science Education and Technology, Electronic Journal of Science Education, and Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. Correspondence: Department of Biology, Faculty of Education, Trnava University, Priemyselná 4, PO Box 9, SK - 918 43, Trnava and Institute of Zoology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK - 845 06 Bratislava, Slovakia. Email: [email protected]
Jana Fančovičová, PhD in biology education from Trnava University, Slovakia. Her main research interests are students’ conceptions of science, and alternative conceptions in biology education
Sue Dale Tunnicliffe Research associate at University of London, United Kingdom. Her main research interests are children‘s learn biology- particularly taxonomy, anatomy and physiology and reproductive biology etc and particularly in museums botanic gardens zoos and home
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(1), P. 75 - 93

Published: Jan. 10, 2009

Children’s knowledge about human anatomy can be examined through several different ways. Making a drawing of the internal features of the human body has been frequently used in recent studies. However, there might be a serious difference in results obtained from a general instruction to students (What you think is inside your body) and specific (e.g. Draw bones that are inside your body) instruction. We examined relationships between these two types of instructions using drawings of the urinary and endocrine systems as the examples with pupils aged 10-14 years. An ANCOVA showed significant relationships between general and special instruction, but …

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75-93

Eila Jeronen, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer in Biology and Geography Education at the University of Oulu, Finland. She is also a Docent in Education, especially in Environmental Education. Her research interests include teaching, studying and learning processes in natural science, environmental education, health education and teacher education. Correspondence: University of Oulu, Department of Educational Sciences and Teacher Education, P.O.Box 2000, 90014, Finland. E-mail: [email protected] .
Juha Jeronen, M.Sc. in Mathematics and postgraduate student in information technology at the University of Jyväskylä. His research interests include topics related to process industry, such as the instability of moving materials. He occasionally also follows, and writes on, environmental education and education in natural science.
Hanna Raustia M.Sc. in Biology at the University of Oulu. Her research interests include issues on global change and environmental ecology.
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(1), P. 1 - 23

Published: Jan. 10, 2009

The article aims to introduce Environmental Education (EE) in Finland and to discuss how it has been taken into account in Finnish nature schools. Firstly, we present EE models used in Finland. Thereafter we describe a qualitative case study on EE in nature schools (NS). The aim of the study was to get information for the development of EE. The research questions were: Who are the visitors to NSs? What are the educational aims in NSs? What kind of educational methods and approaches do NS teachers use? The resultant data for the questions from 1 to 3 is based on …

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1-23

Ninna Jansoon, PhD student at Institute for Innovation and Development of Learning Process, Mahidol University, Thailand. She holds a MSc in analytical chemistry from Prince of Songkla University, Thailand. Her research interests include the design and implementation of intervention strategies in chemistry education, especially experimental design for undergraduate students. She is also interested in using a mental model and analogy to develop students’ understanding
Richard K. Coll, Associate professor of science education at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. Richard holds a PhD in chemistry from Canterbury University and an EdD in science education from Curtin University of Technology. He worked as a lecturer in chemistry in the Pacific and Caribbean before taking up his appointment at Waikato. Richard is deputy dean of the School of Science & Engineering, Associate Dean (International), and Director of Cooperative Education. Richard is Chief Editor of the Journal of Cooperative Education & Internships and serves or has served on the editorial board of numerous science education periodical including the International Journal of Science Education, and the Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Richard is guest editor for a special issue of the International Journal of Environmental & Science Education dedicated to scientific literacy, and he has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and numerous edited books.
Ekasith Somsook Assistant professor of chemistry at Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Thailand. Ekasith holds a PhD in chemistry from University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA. He is now head of NANOCAST laboratory. His ongoing research projects include the synthesis of new ligands for nanotechnology and catalysis, the determination of NMR-based solution structure of biomolecules, the utilization of biomass for sufficiency economy, and the development of new learning process for science students. Correspondence: NANOCAST Laboratory and Center for Alternative Energy, Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 272 Rama VI Rd., Rachathewi, Bangkok 10400, Thailand. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(2), P. 147 - 168

Published: April 10, 2009

The purpose of this study was to investigate Thai students’ understanding of dilution and related concepts. The literature suggests that a complete understanding of chemistry concepts such as dilution entails understanding of and the ability to integrate mental models across three levels of representation: the macroscopic, sub-microscopic and symbolic. In this work students’ understanding was probed using the interview about events (IAE) approach employing open-ended questions, and also by analysis of student descriptions, and drawings. The research findings suggest that all students were able to answer openended questions related to dilution and related concepts. Less able students presented representations at …

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147-168

Mehmet Sahin Instructor in the department of secondary science and mathematics education in the faculty of education, Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey. He has a MSc (1999) degree in physics from the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey and a PhD (2004) in Science Education from the School of Teaching and Learning at the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. His current research interests include physics and science education, physics and science teacher education, teacher professional development, introductory physics teaching, physics-related epistemological beliefs, active learning methods, problem-based learning, and physics and mathematics integration. Correspondence: Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education, Faculty of Education, Dokuz Eylul University, 35160, Buca, Izmir, Turkey. Email: [email protected], [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(2), P. 168 - 184

Published: April 10, 2009

The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of student grades in introductory physics courses utilizing problem-based learning (PBL) approach and traditional lecturing. The study employed correlational/predictive methods to investigate and describe/explain relationships of students’ physics grades with their expectations, attitudes, epistemological beliefs about physics and physics learning, and demographic variables. The subjects involved in this study were 264 freshmen engineering students (PBL, n = 100; traditional, n = 164) at Dokuz Eylül University (DEU) in Izmir, Turkey. All students were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the spring 2007 semester using the Maryland Physics …

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168-184

Fiona Taber, Teacher of geography at The Armidale School in Armidale, NSW, Australia. She has recently completed a BEd Honours in which she received a first class award. Prior to becoming a teacher, Fiona worked in the renewable energy industry.
Neil Taylor School teacher of science and geography in Jamaica and the UK. He has also worked at the University of the South Pacific in Fiji, the University of Leicester in the UK and is presently an Associate Professor in Primary Science and Technology Education at the University of New England in New South Wales, Australia. His research interests include environmental education and science education in developing countries. Correspondence: University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(2), P. 97 - 116

Published: April 10, 2009

Recent research suggests that the issue of global warming is one of great concern for Australian children. This point to the need for effective teaching about this issue. Children should be properly informed about actions that help reduce carbon emissions as this may give them a sense of empowerment and go some way to alleviating concerns. This study followed the development in the knowledge of global warming of 29 primary school students in year 6 (the final year of primary) from two regional Australian schools over one school term. A hands-on science unit dealing specifically with global warming was prepared …

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97-116

Mehmet Erdogan, Department of Educational Sciences, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey. He obtained his PhD (2009) in Curriculum & Instruction from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. His main research interests are environmental education, environmental literacy, and curriculum development & evaluation. Correspondence: Department of Educational Sciences, Faculty of Education, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Gaye Tuncer Part-time instructor in Elementary Science Education at Middle East Technical University, Turkey. She received her Ph.D. (1995) in Environmental Engineering from Middle East Technical University. Her main research interest is environmental education.
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(2), P. 133 - 146

Published: April 10, 2009

This article reported and discussed the evaluation of a lecture, designed to change university students’ values related with sustainable ways of living. The outcomes of the study were those obtained from the evaluation of the course titled “Education and Awareness for Sustainability”, which has been offered for three years in the Department of Elementary Education, Middle East Technical University–Ankara (Turkey). The study was realized with the participation of 85 students from different faculties (faculty of education, economy, administration and engineering). The study comprised three steps: need assessment (NA), formative evaluation (FE) and summative evaluation (SE). The evaluation model of DIPO …

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133-146

Fulya Oztas, Associate professor in Vocational High School of Health at Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey. She received her PhD Degree in Biology Education from Education Enstitute of Dokuz Eylül University, İzmir. Her main research interest is environmental education. Her other research interest include natural sciences, health education, alternative conceptions in biology, concept maps and misconceptions. She published many articles in science education journals, such as Journal of Biological Education, Journal of Science Education, Social Behavior and Personality. Correspondence: Vocational High School of Health, Selçuk University, Campus, Selçuklu- Konya, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Erkan Kalıpçı M.Sc. in Biology and postgraduate student in Environmental Engineering at University of Selçuk, Konya. His research interest includes topics related to environmental pollution and chemical carcinogenesis. He is also interest in environmental education and education in environmental issues such as global changes and environmental ecology.
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(2), P. 185 - 195

Published: April 10, 2009

It is generally accepted that the environmental education deals with a wide range of environmental experiences, methods and processes. Teaching the subject of the environment should not be considered as an easy task. It should not only cover pure ecology education; but also include the citizenship responsibilities and the problems that are sourced from other interdisciplinary factors. Therefore teachers should have the responsibility to facilitate environmental issues. Hitherto no researcher has undertaken a comprehensive study that focuses on environmental education in teacher training programs. This study aims to detect basic environmental knowledge of Turkish teacher candidate at the onset of …

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185-195

Scientific Literacy and Thailand Science Education Creative Commons
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Chokchai Yuenyong, Lecturer of science education in the science education program. His areas of interest are culture, science learning, professional development, and contextual leaning Correspondence: Faculty of Education, Khon Kaen University, Muang, Khon Kaen, 40002, Thailand. Email: [email protected]
Pattawan Narjaikaew Lecturer of science education in graduate students office. His areas of interest are science instruction, science curriculum, contextual learning.
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(3), P. 335 - 349

Published: July 10, 2009

Education and political leaders worldwide are increasingly placing emphasis on developing scientific literacy. This also is the case in Thailand with science education influenced by educational reform in 1999, in which the goals of science education are shaped by the notion of scientific literacy. Thai science education emphasizes the scientific knowledge, the nature of science, and the relationship between science technology and society. Although the school science curriculum features scientific literacy, Thai science education research, articles, national tests, and teaching and learning emphasize scientific achievement with little concern about science as a way of knowing. However, some attempts at developing …

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335-349

Ralf Marks, Grammar school teacher in history and chemistry in an upper secondary school in Bremen, Germany, and working part time as a researcher at the Institute of Science Education of the University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. He just recently finished his PhD in chemistry education. Correspondence: University of Bremen, Institute of Science Education, Department of Biology and Chemistry, Leobener Str. NW2, 28334 Bremen, Germany. E-mail: [email protected]
Ingo Eilks Professor of chemistry education at the University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. He has a background in having been a grammar school teacher in chemistry and mathematics, having a PhD and habilitation in chemistry education. University of Bremen, Institute of Science Education, Department of Biology and Chemistry, Leobener Str. NW2, 28334 Bremen, Germany. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(3), P. 231 - 245

Published: July 10, 2009

This paper revisits the discussion about the objectives of scientific literacy-oriented chemistry teaching, its connection to the German concept of Allgemeinbildung, and the debate of science through education vs. education through science. About 10 years ago the sociocritical and problem-oriented approach to chemistry teaching was suggested using these starting points. In this paper its central assumptions and criteria for structuring lesson plans are presented as they have been refined along a series of lesson plans developed by participatory action research in recent years. The summarized teaching approach intends to more thoroughly promote reflection on scientific questions in the framework of …

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231-245

Dr. Paul Webb Professor of science education and director of the Centre for Research, Technology and Innovation in the Faculty of Education at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), South Africa. His research interests are in the field of understandings of the nature of science, classroom discussion, teaching science and mathematics in disadvantaged schools and, currently, in developing new insights into the notion of scientific literacy. Correspondence: Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth, 6001, South Africa. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(3), P. 313 - 334

Published: July 10, 2009

The focus of this paper is on selected recent South African research studies that have explored efforts to promote the discussion, writing, and arguing aspects of scientific literacy in primary and middle schools, particularly amongst second-language learners. These studies reveal improvements in the participants’ abilities to both use the ‘science notebooks’ approach and argue their findings, as well as statistically significant improvement in their problem solving skills. The positive findings of these studies, and the call for attention to be paid to the fundamental sense of scientific literacy by a number of international researchers, resulted in the development of an …

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313-334

Dr. Danielle Dani Assistant professor of science education at Ohio University. Correspondence: Department of Teacher Education, Ohio University, 252 McCracken Hall, Athens OH 45701, USA. E-Mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(3), P. 289 - 299

Published: July 10, 2009

In the United States and around the world, calls for educational reform stress the need for a scientifically literate population, prepared for the twenty-first century workforce. These calls have translated into new curricula, which in isolation, are not enough? Teachers play an essential role in the development of scientifically literate citizens. Their purposes for teaching science act as filters for acceptable learning and teaching activities. This paper examines the congruence of eight private school teachers’ purposes for teaching science, and aspects of scientific literacy in the Middle Eastern country of Lebanon. Findings are discussed in light of contextual factors that …

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289-299

Beyond Science Literacy: Science and the Public Creative Commons
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Xiufeng Liu Associate Professor of Science Education and Director of the EdM in Science and the Public program. His research interests include learning progression of unified concepts, science curriculum policies, and technology-enhanced science assessment. Correspondence: Department of Learning and Instruction, Graduate School of Education, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(3), P. 301 - 311

Published: July 10, 2009

The late 20th century and beginning of 21st century have witnessed unprecedented rapid economic development due to advances in technology and globalization. In response to this development, a renewed call for science literacy has become louder in the USA and many other countries. Common to all science education reforms around the world is emphasis on achieving science literacy by all children before high school graduation. This paper first reviews definitions of science literacy in the literature; it then examines the status of science literacy in the USA and other countries. Following the above, this paper then presents a new notion …

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301-311

On Scientific Literacy and Curriculum Reform Creative Commons
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Justin Dillon Senior Lecturer in Science and Environmental Education and Head of the Science and Technology Education Group at King’s College London, UK. He is President of the European Science Education Research Association. Correspondence: Department of Education and Professional Studies, King’s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(3), P. 201 - 213

Published: July 10, 2009

Since the first use of ‘scientific literacy’ in the late 1950s, numerous science educators and policy makers have reconceptualised the term to such an extent that it has been described as being ‘ill-defined and diffuse’. Despite this lack of clarity, the term is the focus of curriculum standards in many countries and is at the heart of international comparisons of student attainment including the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) study. Uncritical use of the term masks the existence of deep-seated philosophical clashes that hinder reform of science education in many countries throughout …

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201-213

The Meaning of Scientific Literacy Creative Commons
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Jack Holbrook, Visiting professor in science education at the University of Tartu, the president of ICASE (International Council of Associations for Science Education) and a freelance education consultant in the area of curriculum development, teacher education and assessment with work experience in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Estonia, Hong Kong, India, Jordan, Nigeria, Tanzania, USA and the UK. Correspondence: Centre for Science Education, University of Tartu, Estonia. E-Mail: [email protected]
Miia Rannikmae Professor in science education at the University of Tartu, with research interests in curriculum development, relevance, critical thinking, literacy and inquiry teaching in science education. She has extensive school teaching experience and been involved as a committee member of a number of international science education organisations and in European Commission projects. She was a Fulbright scholar in 2003
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(3), P. 275 - 288

Published: July 10, 2009

This paper sets out to provide an overview of scientific literacy specifically related to whether emphasis is placed on the ‘science’ or the ‘literacy’ aspect, accepting that literacy, wherever used, is wider than simply reading and writing. It does this from a general rather than a country perspective. The emphasis in giving meaning to scientific literacy is placed on the literacy component in recognition of the trend towards relating scientific literacy to skills and values appropriate for a responsible citizen. Rejected is a consideration that scientific literacy is related to an emphasis on the acquisition of content and this is …

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275-288

Dimopoulos Dimitrios, Environmental Manager at Piraeus Bank in Greece. He is Biologist and has a PhD in Environmental Education at Department of Biology, University of Thessaloniki. His main research interests are on environmental management in protected areas, public environmental awareness and sustainable development. E-mail: [email protected]
Paraskevopoulos Stefanos, Associate Professor of Ecology and Environmental Education at Department of Special Education, University of Thessaly, Greece. His main research interests are on ecological literacy, environmental education, learning methods for special needs education and social ecology. Correspondence: Department of Special Education, University of Thessaly, Argonafton & Filellinon, 38221, Volos, Greece. E-mail: [email protected]
Pantis D. John Professor of Ecology at Department of Biology, University of Thessaloniki, Greece. His main research interests are on ecological conservation management, landscape ecology, acoustic ecology and education for sustainability. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(4), P. 351 - 364

Published: Oct. 10, 2009

This paper describes the design of an educational module which aims to raise awareness and change the attitudes of elementary school students about focal endangered species in protected areas. The proposed design builds on, and extends the General Teaching Model. The educational module which was developed through this approach was pilot-tested in two Greek elementary school classes, involving 29 students who provided their opinion through a questionnaire. The results verify that the educational module had a significant effect on the cognitive level and the attitudes of the students. Therefore, it is argued that the proposed design approach can form the …

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351-364

Musa Dikmenli, Associate professor in Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education in Faculty of Education at Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey. He received his PhD Degree in Biology from Institute of Science, Selçuk University, Konya. His current research interests include biology education, biology teacher education, teacher professional development, active learning methods
Osman Çardak, Associate professor in Department of Science Education in Faculty of Education at Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey. He received his PhD Degree in Biology from Institute of Science, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey. His current research interests include biology and science education, science teacher education, teacher professional development, active learning methods
Fulya Oztas Associate professor in Vocational High School of Health at Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey. She received her PhD Degree in Biology Education from Education Institute of Dokuz Eylül University, İzmir. Her main research interest is environmental education. Her other research interest include natural sciences, health education, alternative conceptions in biology, concept maps and misconceptions. Correspondence: Vocational High School of Health, Selçuk University, Campus, Selçuklu- Konya, Turkey. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(4), P. 429 - 440

Published: Oct. 10, 2009

Determination of conceptual problems which may cause alternative conceptions in science and technology textbooks is significant to increase in success of pupils and teachers. It is a vital issue to arrange books in a way removing or decreasing these faults in order to improve a better education via textbooks. This study aims to determine conceptual problems which may cause alternative conceptions in biology topics in science and technology textbooks of primary schools. In this study, the units of each textbook were analyzed page by page according to document examination method and conceptual problems were determined. The founded conceptual problems have …

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429-440

Dr Michael Skoumios Obtained a first degree in Physics from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in 1987, a second degree in Education from the University of Aegean in 1992 and his PhD in Science Education from the Hellenic Open University in 2005. His research interests include science concept learning and teaching science in primary and secondary schools. He is currently teaching science education in the Department of Primary Education of the University of the Aegean, Greece. Correspondence: Dept. of Primary Education, University of the Aegean, Rhodes, Greece. E-Mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(4), P. 381 - 399

Published: Oct. 10, 2009

Sociocognitive conflict has been used as a teaching strategy which may contribute to change students’ conceptions about science concepts. The present paper aims at investigating the structure of the dialogic argumentation developed by students, when they are involved in science teaching sequence that have been designed to change their conceptions through sociocognitive conflict strategy. For this purpose, teaching sequence targeted at the elaboration of students’ conceptions about floating and sinking -based on sociocognitive conflict processes- were prepared and implemented among 14 years old students. Next, the dialogues which the students had during the teaching sequence were analysed with the help …

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381-399

Susanne Menzel, Ph.D. in Didactics of Biology, which she received at Göttingen University (Germany) in 2007. She currently works as a Junior Professor at the department of Biology/ Chemistry at Osnabrück University in Northwest-Germany. Her research foci are empirical studies on biodiversity education, global learning and learning opportunities in botanical gardens. Most of her research projects have an intercultural perspective. Correspondence: Georg-AugustUniversität Göttingen, Faculty of Biology, Albrecht-von-Haller Institute for Plant Research, Didactics of Biology, Waldweg 26, 37073 Göttingen, Germany. Current address: Universität Osnabrück, Faculty of Biology/ Chemistry, Didactics of Biology, Barbarastr. 11, 49076 Osnabrück, Germany. E-mail: [email protected], uni-osnabrueck.de
Susanne Bögeholz Ph.D. in Didactics of Biology (IPN Kiel). She is a full professor for Didactics of Biology at Göttingen University, Germany. Her research interests are Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), biodiversity education, modelling of competences related to ESD and evaluation of ESD programmes. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2009, Volume and Issue: 4(4), P. 31 - 49

Published: Jan. 10, 2009

Fostering young people‟s commitment to protect biodiversity is an important goal of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in both, industrial countries and designated biodiversity hotspots. However, little empirical evidence exists to describe factors that influence such commitments. Based on the Value-Belief-Norm (VBN) theory, 15 to 19-year-old Chilean (n= 216) and German (n= 217) pupils‟ commitment to protect biodiversity was investigated. Comparisons revealed that Chilean adolescents showed higher personal norms and commitments to protect biodiversity. Regression analysis showed that within the German sample, the „Schwartz‟-value universalism was an important predictor for three different kinds of behavioural commitment. In both samples, „ascription …

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2008

Mustafa Dogru Akdeniz University, Antalya, TURKEY. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(1), P. 9 - 18

Published: Jan. 10, 2008

Helping student to improve the problems solving skills is the primary target of the science teacher trainees. In modern science, for training the students, methods should be used for improving their thinking skills, make connections with events and concepts and scientific operations skills rather than information and definition giving. One of these methods are problem solving.With this study, it is shown that problem solving is not just solving a movement problem like in the physics as it is understood by most of the science teachers but it can be used also in social problems like environmental problems. Further more, scientific …

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9-18

Funda Ornek Funda Ornek
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(2), P. 35 - 45

Published: April 10, 2008

In this paper, I discussed different types of models in science education and applications of them in learning and teaching science in particular physics. Based on the literature, I categorized models as conceptual and mental models according to their characteristics. In addition to these models, there is another model called “physics model” by the physics-education community. And then, I discussed applications of these models for learning and teaching science particularly physics along with examples that can guide teachers and students in their science courses.

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35-45

Turkish Students’ Ideas about Global Warming Creative Commons
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Ahmet Kılınç, Ahi Evran University, Kırşehir-Turkey
Martin Stanisstreet, Environmental Education Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool - UK
Edward Boyes Environmental Education Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool - UK
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(2), P. 89 - 98

Published: April 10, 2008

A questionnaire was used to explore the prevalence of ideas about global warming in Year 10 (age 15-16 years) school students in Turkey. The frequencies of individual scientific ideas and misconceptions about the causes, consequences and ‘cures’ of global warming were identified. In addition, several general findings emerged from this study. Firstly, many students believed that radioactivity is causally linked to global warming; they believed that radioactive leakage from nuclear power stations exacerbates global warming, and that reducing the global nuclear arsenal could reduce it. Secondly, students appeared to confuse the causes and consequences of global warming with those of …

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Josiah. O. Ajiboye, Department of Primary Education, Faculty of Education, University of Botswana, BOTSWANA
S. O. Ajitoni Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NIGERIA
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(2), P. 58 - 66

Published: April 10, 2008

Environmental education is considered an appropriate intervention for creating awareness of, and an understanding of the challenges of environmental degradation. The introduction of EE into the Nigerian school curricular creates a challenge of how to teach it. A majority of the teachers still employ the old, traditional “chalk and talk” method. This study experimented with two modes of participatory strategies, the full and quasi participatory modes in teaching secondary school students in Nigeria some EE concepts. Three hundred and sixty students were randomly selected and assigned to the three treatment groups. Five hypotheses were tested at P<.05 and data …

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Hava İpek, Research Assistant of Science Education at Karadeniz Technical University. She is currently completing a PhD at KTU. She holds an MSc in Science Education with a master thesis entitled ‘Developing instructional materials about electricity in our life unit for 8th grade primary school students and to assess their effectiveness'. Her research interests contain design and implementation of intervention strategies to enhance students' conceptions. Correspondence: Karadeniz Technical University, Fatih Faculty of Education, Department of Science Education, 61335 Trabzon/Turkey.
Muammer Çalık Assistant Professor of Chemistry Education at Karadeniz Technical University. He has a wide range of research interests including identification, design and implementation of intervention strategies to challenge students' conceptions and students' use of analogies and models as an aid to their conceptual understanding of science concepts and meta-analysis, nature of science, evaluation of science textbooks and animations to achieve conceptual change. He is the author of more than 30 papers and acts as reviewer for a range of journals, and is on editorial/advisory/review boards for Journal of Chemical Education, Journal of Science Education and Technology, International Education Journal, Journal of Turkish Science Education, International Journal of Environmental and Science Education and Journal of Research in Science Teaching.
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(3), P. 143 - 153

Published: June 10, 2008

Based on students‟ alternative conceptions of the topics „electric circuits‟, „electric charge flows within an electric circuit‟, „how the brightness of bulbs and the resistance changes in series and parallel circuits‟, the current study aims to present a combination of different conceptual change methods within four-step constructivist teaching model. Therefore, the author assumes that such a design may give a chance to eliminate students‟ alternative conceptions fully. Also, some suggestions were made for further research.

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Josiah O. Ajiboye, Senior Lecturer at the University of Botswana. He has a PhD in Social and Environmental Studies from the University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. He teaches and research in the areas of social studies education and environmental Education. Correspondence: Department of Primary Education, University of Botswana, Botswana.
Nthalivi Silo Lecturer in the Social & Environmental Education Unit, Department of Primary Education, University of Botswana. She holds a Masters degree in Biology Education and currently enrolled as a PhD candidate in Environmental Education.
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(3), P. 105 - 114

Published: June 10, 2008

An intervention study was set up through the School Civic Clubs to improve Botswana Children’s environmental knowledge, attitudes and practices. The underlying assumption in using this informal approach was based on the premise that the school time table is already overcrowded and that the infusion approach currently adopted in the country has not produced the desired results. Hence, the Civic Clubs were introduced into ten Primary schools in Botswana. Using this informal approach, the children were given requisite training in civic and environmental issues, and they engaged in various activities for a period of six weeks. Data was collected before …

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105-114

Paul J. Bischoff, The State University of New York-College at Oneonta, USA
Devin Castendyk, The State University of New York-College at Oneonta, USA
Hugh Gallagher, The State University of New York-College at Oneonta, USA
John Schaumloffel, The State University of New York-College at Oneonta, USA
Sunil Labroo The State University of New York-College at Oneonta, USA
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(3), P. 131 - 141

Published: June 10, 2008

Now in its fifth year, PR2EPS is a National Science Foundation funded initiative designed to recruit high school students to attend college majoring in the physical sciences, including engineering and secondary science education, and to help ensure their retention within these programs until graduation. A central feature of the recruitment effort is a free, one-week residential summer science camp for high school students. This report describes the rationale for using a camp as a recruitment tool as well as the camp structure. Two focus questions are addressed: 1) How successful is the camp at providing a learning environment where participants …

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131-141

Mustafa Çakır Faculty member in secondary science and mathematics education in Ataturk Faculty of Education, Marmara University, Turkey. Dr. Çakır earned his PhD (2004) and MSc (2000) in Science Education from the Pennsylvania State University. His current research focuses on assisting students in developing understandings of scientific inquiry, nature of science, and relevance of science to society that are consistent with current practice and helping them to develop understandings and skills that are necessary for citizens of 21st century.
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(4), P. 193 - 206

Published: Oct. 9, 2008

This paper draws attention to the literature in the areas of learning, specifically, constructivism, conceptual change and cognitive development. It emphasizes the contribution of such research to our understanding of the learning process. This literature provides guidelines for teachers, at all levels, in their attempt to have their students achieve learning with understanding. Research about the constructive nature of students’ learning processes, about students’ mental models, and students’ misconceptions have important implications for teachers who wish to model scientific reasoning in an effective fashion for their students. This paper aims to communicate this research to teachers, textbook authors, and college …

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193-206

Laura Barraza, PhD in Environmental Education from Cambridge University, United Kingdom. She is currently a researcher for IFAW-Latin America and works as a consultant for the Ministry of Education State of Michoacán. Her main interest covers perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge about the environment in different cultural settings, cognitive processes involved in the acquisition and incorporation of environmental learning, training and developing environmental education programs. E-mail: [email protected]
Ian Robottom Deputy Dean and Associate Dean (International) in the Faculty of Arts & Education, Deakin University (Melbourne, Australia). He was Editor of the Australian Journal of Environmental Education for nine years, and has directed several international projects in community-based environmental education and education for sustainability. He has over 100 publications in the fields of environmental education, participatory research, science education and professional development. His current role involves establishing international partnerships in teaching, research and capacity building. Correspondence: Faculty of Arts and Education, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Hwy, Burwood 3215 Victoria, Australia. E-mail: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(4), P. 179 - 191

Published: Oct. 6, 2008

In this decade of Education for Sustainable Development, it is timely to consider the methodological issues associated with researching this topic not only with adults but also with the young children who, as members of the next generation, will experience the success or otherwise of current environmental sustainability efforts. We argue that it is important when making methodological choices to recognize that both the sustainability issues themselves and the way individuals learn about these issues, are socially and culturally constructed. In this article we are interested in ways of gaining representations of individuals’ mental constructions of environmental sustainability issues. We …

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Meshach B. Ogunniyi PhD is a Senior Professor of Science Education and the Director of School of the School of Science & Mathematics Education, University of the Western Cape, South Africa. Correspondence: School of Science and Mathematics Education, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X 17 Bellville, Cape Town, 7535, South Africa. Email: [email protected]
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2008, Volume and Issue: 3(4), P. 159 - 177

Published: Oct. 7, 2008

With the increased global awareness of the negative impact of scientific, technological and industrial activities on the environment and copious examples of sustainable practices existing in many an indigenous community, the new South African science curriculum statement has called on science teachers to integrate school science with the Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS). In response to this call, this study used an Argumentation-Based course (A-B course) to enhance teachers’ understanding of the Nature of Science (NOS) and IKS and their ability to integrate science and IKS in their classrooms. Nine teachers participated in the course over a six-month period. Using questionnaires …

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159-177

2007

Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2007, Volume and Issue: 2(1), P. 32 - 37

Published: Jan. 10, 2007

Current research has begun to reveal a link between environmental education and increases in science achievement and understanding (Glynn 2000; Liederman and Hoody, 1998). The researchers in this study of participants in a coastal marine teacher workshop found that increases in environmental topics or lessons in teachers’ classrooms post-program were minimal. Several limitations to infusion were revealed, including teachers’ perceived obligation to strictly follow science standards, and an increased emphasis on preparation for standardized tests. The results suggest that greater emphasis is needed on providing opportunities for participants to make explicit connections with their instruction within the parameters of the …

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32-37

Mustafa Doğru, Ministry of Education, Amasya, TURKEY, E-mail:[email protected]
Suna Kalender Deparment of Science Education, Gazi Faculty of Education, University of Gazi, Ankara, TURKEY
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2007, Volume and Issue: 2(1), P. 3 - 13

Published: Jan. 7, 2007

In this study our purpose is to determine how the teachers are applying the structuralist approach in their classes by classifying the teachers according to graduated faculty, department and their years in the duty. Besides understanding the difference of the effects of structuralist approach and traditional education method on studennt success and knowledge sustainability For the study the teachers are given likert type surveys and primary school 6th clas students are used as final test and the repeat of the last test as data collecting tools The study, has been carried in 23 schools in Mersin City Center with 53 …

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3-13

Erdal Tatar, Ataturk University, Kazim Karabekir Education Faculty, Department of Science and Mathematics, Education, 25240Erzurum/TURKEY
Münir Oktay Ataturk University, Kazim Karabekir Education Faculty, Department of Science and Mathematics, Education, 25240Erzurum/TURKEY
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2007, Volume and Issue: 2(3), P. 79 - 81

Published: June 10, 2007

This paper serves to review previously reported studies on students’ misunderstandings about the energy conservation principle (the first law of thermodynamics). Generally, studies in literature highlighted student’ misunderstandings about the energy conservation principle stem from preliminaries about energy concept in daily life. Since prior knowledge of students’ misunderstandings of scientific content knowledge is the first step in preventing these misunderstandings, it is considered that such a study will provide an important source for studies which aims to reduce or eliminate misunderstandings on the energy conservation principle.

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79-81

Lutfullah Turkmen, Uşak University, Faculty of Education, Uşak, Turkey
Emine Selcen Darcin Gazi University, Faculty of Education, Ankara, Turkey
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2007, Volume and Issue: 2(4), P. 125 - 131

Published: June 10, 2017

The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge levels of popular biotechnological issues of Turkish science and elementary teacher candidates. A questionnaire was administered during 2006-2007 school term to 336 students pursuing their education in the departments of science and elementary education in two Turkish universities. The questionnaire covers six biotechnological issues such as biotechnology, agrobiotechnology, human health and pharmacy, environment and biotechnology, and food production with biotechnology. Results revealed that whereas science and elementary teacher candidates had an approximate consistent knowledge of describing biotechnology and human health/pharmacy that almost all students had an inadequate knowledge about other …

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125-131

Fatma EKICI, Research Associate in Science Education, Gazi University, Faculty of Gazi Education, Primary Science Teacher Education, Teknikokullar, Ankara, TURKEY
Erhan EKICI, Research Associate in Science Education, Gazi University, Faculty of Gazi Education, Primary Science Teacher Education, Teknikokullar, Ankara, TURKEY
Fatih AYDIN Research Associate in Science Education, Gazi University, Faculty of Gazi Education, Primary Science Teacher Education, Teknikokullar, Ankara, TURKEY
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2007, Volume and Issue: 2(4), P. 111 - 124

Published: June 10, 2007

In this study, the effectiveness of concept cartoons in diagnosing and overcoming students’ misconceptions related to photosynthesis subject was examined. Firstly, the literature has been thoroughly examined and misconceptions about photosynthesis subject have been listed and then grouped. Concept cartoons related to these groups have been prepared and were introduced to the students in order to identify their misconceptions. Similar misconceptions as in the literature have been found. Then, new concept cartoons addressing to elimination of these misconceptions have been prepared and were used in class discussions. The excerpts from these discussions and after-class student interviews show that concept cartoons …

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111-124

Özlem Doğan TEMUR Private Primary School of Gazi University Foundation,TURKEY
Interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental and Science Education, Journal Year: 2007, Volume and Issue: 2(4), P. 86 - 91

Published: June 10, 2007

The aim of this research is to reveal that to teaching activities which are designed according to the Multiple Intelligence Theory have effects on the students success in mathematics and on the permanence of the knowledge learned. This research has been carried out the fourth graders at Gazi University Foundation Private Primary school. Among all the classes, two of them were selected, 4-A was selected as an experimental group and 4B as a control group considering their pre-test points. The groups attending to the research were applied a permanence test which examines the behaviors that have to be gained before …

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